How Not to Write a PhD Thesis

This is a great read and a great resource.  Glad there are people out there providing tips like these. http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/how-not-to-write-a-phd-thesis/410208.article

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A thesis workout schedule

The Thesis Whisperer

A conversation with my sister on the tram tonight got me thinking about the similarity between doing a thesis and an exercise program.

I was trying (as I usually do) to convince said sister that she should do a PhD. During my rant she just sat there with that patient look that she gets when I start in on the topic. When I finished she told me I was selling it well, but she remembered me doing it. All she saw was how  stressed out I was during the ordeal and looked terrible I looked when it was over. She pointed out it had taken me well over a year to recover.

I acknowledged this was probably true, but that I had bounced back better than ever. What had that year given me? Recovery time.

Apparently when we exercise we need to build in recovery time for the body…

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Hashing it over

The Research Whisperer

Pink button with # symbol and blank line, held in an open palm Hashtag button (Photo by Eclecticlibrarian)

Anyone who has converted to Twitter, and uses it with regularity will know about the prevalent use of hashtags to ‘stream’ tweet content.

If you don’t know what I’m talking about, have a quick read of this official Twitter page, or check out the wittier, unofficial Guardian version.

In short:

A hashtag, for the non-Twitterati, is a word or smashed-together phrase preceded by the hash symbol (#), originally devised as a way to keep track of the flow of subject matter in the Twittersphere. (Ben Zimmer, Visual Thesaurus)

I recently saw someone on Facebook cramming hashtags into their status update. I must admit to rolling my eyes and muttering acidly, “It’s not Twitter, doofus” (oh, yes, fear my acidity).

Yes, I know Facebook is trying to get in on the hashtag action, but – in the very average ways I use Fb –…

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Crowdfunding your research

The Research Whisperer

Dear researcher

Thank you very much for sending through your funding proposal. You mentioned that you are trying to obtain corporate sponsorship for this project. That is excellent, and you should continue.

You might also like to think about using a crowdfunding service. Crowdfunding allows you to raise funds from the public. It isn’t for everybody and it is a lot of work but I think that it might suit your project.

To this end, I’ve done a quick analysis of your project’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) that might help you to decide if you want to try to raise funds this way. I hope that you find it useful. Let me know if you want to go ahead.

Before I begin, I should make it clear that everything that follows is just my opinion. It’s early days for crowdfunding, and I don’t have any

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Surviving a PhD – 10 Top Tips…

Important to read before commencing a PhD

The Thesis Whisperer

This post is by Dr Alex Hope, a  Lecturer in Sustainable Development and Project Management at Northumbria University in the United Kingdom and was originally post on his blog. Alex is also on Twitter where he tweets about sustainability, academia, PhD advice and life. I hope you will head on over there and check out what he has to say!

I was awarded my PhD in January this year following a successful viva in November 2011, so thought I would try and summarise my experiences over the last 3-4 years and see if I could come up with some key points of advice from start to finish…

Tip 1 – Academics need you: Most are keen to speak to any potential student who has a good research idea as a good record of successful PhD supervisions is essential to build a successful academic career. Don’t be afraid to approach a…

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Top 10 ways to annoy your PhD supervisors

will be taking these on board.

Nick Hopwood

 

I should start this post by saying very clearly that what follows is by no means a comment on the many fantastic students I work with and have worked with. I should also be clear that this does not reflect official policy of UTS: it reflects my personal views and is deliberately provocative at times.

The title is a little flippant: this isn’t just about (not) annoying your supervisors, but about the broader and crucial issue of maintaining health supervisory relationships, and making the most out of what supervision has to offer. As you’ll see if you read on, successful doctoral candidature is also about being part of a wider institution and realising that doctoral education and support is much more than supervision.

This is written from the voice of your supervisor, and some points may be more relevant in social sciences and humanities, but most should be worth…

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